Text Size: SMALL  LARGE


Ready for Surgery!

 

From: "Jordan Rosner"
Sent: June 19, 2007

I am a 31 year old man. I was first diagnosed with epilepsy in the fifth grade. It took years and various doctors for one to finally determine that I have a grand mal seizure disorder. The dilantin only eliminated the Grand mals. It never stopped the petite mals. Several years ago, he started me on keppra and lamictal. Until a couple weeks ago, I had had only one petite mal in almost 2 years.

Over the past month, I started to have severe headaches, loss of balance, problems with speech, a complete loss of appetite, double vision, and had a seizure. My family physician had me checked into the hospital for observation. A neurosurgeon determined from an MRI that I have a cavernous angioma about the size of a grape in the right cerebellum, fairly close to the stem. He said it was causing my brain to bleed. He wouldn't do the surgery right away because he wanted the swelling in my brain to go down. I will be going in for surgery in just a few days.

The surgeon said it will be a simple procedure for him, but a painful one for me when the meds wear off a few days after surgery. He believes I will be at full strength within 4 to 6 weeks. I've been told that a rehab doctor will visit me a few days after surgery when I am coherent. He or she will then decide if I need to move to the rehab floor, and for how long. It sounds like a step-by-step process. I am more apprehensive than nervous about all of this.

It's just a little scary to know that a a part of my brain will be opened for the angioma to be removed. At the same time, I know I am in good hands. This guy is not your typical surgeon! He is noted as the best neurosurgeon in the midwestern region. He is very empathetic, modest, down to earth, and treats you like a human being. A neurologist told me that the average neurosurgeon is sued for malpractice every 2 1/2 years. He has been practicing for 21 years, and has yet to be sued for malpractice. The other neurosurgeons call him "The Wonderboy." (Dr. Paul Camarata)

Jordan Rosner